Overheated? Tips on Keeping Your Cool and Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses

Overheated carUnless your fair is lucky enough to be near the coast, chances are it’s already very, very warm where you are. Add the fact that there is always work that needs to be done around your fairgrounds before, during and after fair, as well as in between summer interim events, and you have the ideal setting for heat-related illnesses.

Be Cool, Work Smart! To help reduce the risk of heat-related illnesses, everyone from office staff to maintenance crews to ticket takers in non-air conditioned ticket booths needs to be aware of the conditions that can bring about heat exhaustion and heat stroke. They also need to know what symptoms to look for, and what to do when they or someone nearby is experiencing these symptoms.
Did you know that a  relative humidity of 60% or more hampers sweat evaporation and challenges your body’s ability to adequately cool itself? Or that  temperatures don’t even have to be in the 100s to be potentially dangerous to your health?

People are at a greater risk of heat illness if they:

  • are dehydrated (dehydration is your worst enemy!)
  • aren’t acclimated to working in the heat
  • are obese, in poor health or are older
  • have previously experienced a heat-related illness
  • are on a low-salt diet
  • take medications or over-the-counter drugs
  • use alcohol

Prevention Takes Pre-Planning:
To help prevent overheating, health experts recommend wearing loose-fitting lightweight clothing and a large-brimmed hat, and staying hydrated. (Don’t forget the sunscreen!)

To stay hydrated, choose water or sports beverages over sodas and other drinks containing caffeine or lots of sugar. Avoid alcohol altogether as the more you drink, the more dehydrated you will become. If you anticipate working outdoors, start drinking water/sports drinks two to three hours beforehand (or even the day before if you are extremely susceptible). Continue to drink seven to 10 ounces of water every half hour during outdoor activity and follow up with an additional eight ounces of water within a half hour of finishing your activity. (If you are on a fluid-restricted diet or have a problem with fluid retention, please check with your doctor before increasing your fluid intake.)

Symptoms to Watch For:
Heat exhaustion –  Although not as serious as heat stroke, heat exhaustion still isn’t something to take lightly. It can develop into heat stroke, which can damage the brain and other vital organs.

Common symptoms of heat exhaustion include chills, unsteady walking, nausea or vomiting, confusion, dizziness, fainting, headache, muscle or abdominal cramps,  heavy sweating or no sweating, pale skin and a rapid heartbeat.  Get medical help if there is vomiting, if symptoms last longer than 15 minutes or if symptoms get worse over time.

If you or a colleague experiences any of these symptoms, move immediately to a cool, shady spot or even better, an air-conditioned area indoors. Drink cool water or sports drinks; remove any tight or unnecessary clothing; drench clothing worn in cool water; take a cool shower, bath or sponge bath; use fans or ice packs (under arms and on groin). After recovering from a bout of heat exhaustion you may be more sensitive to high temperatures so it’s a good idea to avoid working outdoors or participating  in heavy outdoor activity for about a week.

Signs of heat stroke include a body temperature of 103 F or higher; loss of consciousness; coma; hot, red, dry or damp skin; dizziness; a sudden headache; loss of coordination; blurry vision; confusion; vomiting; or seizures. Heat stroke is considered a medical emergency – call 911 and immediately m ove the worker to a shaded or air-conditioned area. While waiting for medics to arrive, help lower the person’s temperature with fanning, by soaking clothing with cool water and by applying cool compresses. Do not provide anything to drink.

Heat cramps are painful muscle spasms and muscle pain. Anyone experiencing heat cramps should  take an immediate break in the shade and drink cool water or a sports beverage. Resume work only after the cramps have gone away. Get medical help if cramps last longer than an hour, if the person is on a low-salt diet or if the person has heart problems.

Rule of thumb: If you or a co-worker experiences any of these symptoms  or if you simply begin feeling ill, stop working, tell someone and take a break in a shady, cool area.

Members of CFSA’s Workers’ Compensation Pool Program are encouraged to talk to their Risk Control specialists about on-site training or for help developing a written heat-illness prevention program.

Download a free heat safety tool to your phone from the OSHA website! The app, available for Android and iPhone cell phones, and in English and Spanish (set the phone language to Spanish) enables the user to calculate the heat index for their worksite and to determine the risk level to outdoor workers. Visit:  https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html

Questions? Please contact your fair’s Risk Control specialist or Tom Amberson, CFSA’s Risk Department manager, at 916/ 263-6180 or  tamberson@cfsa.org.

2018 Sacramento County Fair Turns a Teen’s Wish for his Own Carnival into a Reality

Join CFSA in this shout out to Sacramento County Fair! We’re proud to have the fair as a member of both the General Liability and the Workers’ Compensation pool programs!

From the online edition of the Carmichael Times comes this story about how the Sacramento County Fair made a Stockton teen’s wish come true:


As an added bonus this year, the Sacramento County Fair is partnering with Make-A-Wish® Foundation to host Terrell and his Adopt-A-Wish® sponsors, Sutter Health. Terrell, 14, who battles leukemia, wishes to have his very own carnival, so the Sacramento County Fairgrounds will open one day early so Terrell’s wish can come true.

Not only has Terrell has shown bravery by fighting his critical illness, but recently he was recognized as a local hero for saving neighbors in their apartment building after it caught on fire in Stockton. At his carnival, Sutter employees will be there to support him in his wish coming true as well the Stockton Fire Department to recognize him as a local hero.

“Wishes would not be possible without the collective support of our local community,” said Jennifer Stolo, President and CEO of Make-A-Wish® Northeastern California and Northern Nevada. “Because of Adopt-A-Wish sponsors like Sutter Health and lending lands from the Sacramento County Fair, Terrell’s wish is going to be a magical experience for him and his family.”


 

Becky Bailey-Findley Talks About the Importance of California’s Fairs at the Nevada County Fair Foundation Speaker Series

 

Ever wonder what CFSA’s executive director, Becky Bailey-Findley,  is doing when she isn’t in the office working on projects for our member fairs? Well, last Wednesday, March 14, 2018, she was AT a member fair, talking ABOUT fairs! The Nevada County Fair invited her to be a guest speaker in the fairgrounds’ Foundation Speaker Series. Take a look:

http://nevadacountyfair.com/tag/california-fair-services-authority/

Risk Management Tips for Risk Sharing Pool Members…

Read Up! Current CFSA risk-sharing pool MOCs are on CFSA’s website 

Learn all of the ways CFSA’s risk-sharing pool programs  protect your fair and fairground by reading the programs’ Summaries of Coverage and the more-detailed Memorandums of Coverage (MOCs) available at  www.cfsa.org.  Note: MOCs are “in effect until terminated” so if there are no changes, an MOC could remain in effect for a period of years. Coverage periods are stated on the MOC’s cover page.  

Here are direct links to:
Workers’ Compensation MOC
Revenue Protection MOC
Special Events  MOC
General Liability (The GL Summary of Protection and   MOC are currently being updated to reflect recent changes. For program information in the meantime, please contact Tom Amberson at tamberson@cfsa.org or (916) 263-6180.)

 

Be Prepared! Do you know where your Red Cards and Red Book are?
When an accident happens, and adrenaline surges, it’s easy to forget what to do, what paperwork to fill out and who/what agencies needs to be notified. That’s why CFSA created the Red Card – a quick “what to do” laminated reference card CFSA recommends posting in strategic spots around the fairground where employees congregate. And the Red Book aka theClaims and Loss Report Guide, a more in-depth reference complete with sample forms.

If you need additional copies of the Red Card, please contact Lianne Lewellen at llewellen@cfsa.org or (916) 263-6145.
Work Smart, Work Safe!
Ergonomic training is an investment in your staff

Whether someone works at a desk or out on the fairgrounds, knowing how to set up an ergonomically correct workspace and how to best use the tools of your trade are surefire ways to help head off most preventable injuries.

CFSA can help!
CFSA’s risk control specialists are also ergonomics specialists. To have an ergonomic study conducted at your fairground, contact your risk control specialist or Tom Amberson,  risk department manager at tamberson@cfsa.org or (916) 263-6180.

Plumas-Sierra County Fair CEO Recognized by the Plumas County Fire Chiefs Association

 

January 12, 2018 

Join CFSA in a salute to Plumas-Sierra County Fair CEO John Steffanic, and his wife, who received a special plaque in recognition of their outstanding support to Plumas County fire services. Here’s the full online article published by The Plumas County News:

Fire chiefs recognize outstanding service and support
Multiple special recognition awards were handed out at the year-end meeting of the Plumas County Fire Chiefs Association. Thirty members and guests participated in the annual event at the Graeagle Fire Department, followed by a BBQ lunch.

John Steffanic and his wife Denise Morganroth of Sierra Promotions received special thanks, in recognition of ongoing outstanding support to the Plumas County fire service.

“John suggested we do a Firefighters Muster at the Plumas-Sierra County Fair, through his part-time role as Fair Director,” said PCFCA secretary treasurer and Plumas Eureka Chief Tom Forster, “… in addition, they have generously donated all of the awards and T-shirts for the event each year, through their Portola business Sierra Promotions.”

John Steffanic, CEO of the Plumas-Sierra County Fair, with wife, Denise Morganroth.Tom Forster, PCFCA secretary/treasurer and Plumas Eureka Fire Chief, left, with husband-wife team Denise Morganroth and John Steffanic, CEO of the Plumas-Sierra County Fair.

A CFSA Member Fair Salute: Four Fairs Step Up to Help Communities Threatened by Wildfires

As Southern California wildfires close freeways, destroy homes and force thousands to evacuate, California’s fairgrounds are once again opening their doors and hearts to the needs of their communities. We’re proud to note that four of these fairgrounds currently serving as fire camps, evacuation centers and animal shelters are CFSA members. We salute:

– Ventura County Fairgrounds: CALFire Fire Camp, Evacuation Center, Animal Shelter;
– Santa Barbara County Fairgrounds: Animal Shelter;
– Antelope Valley Fairgrounds: Animal Shelter;
– Santa Maria Fairgrounds & Park: Animal Shelter (on stand-by).

Thank you for all of your hard work and most of all, for your compassion.

In the News: Shasta District Fairgrounds Hosts North Valley Stand Down

CFSA Salutes the Shasta District Fairgrounds for holding the 12th Annual North Valley Stand Down this week, Thursday, October 26 – Saturday, October 28. The Stand Down is an opportunity for homeless and at-risk veterans, their families and even their pets to get some much needed help. According to the article in the Redding Record Searchlight newspaper, the event is billed as a “hand up, not a hand out,” and sponsored by the nonprofit North Valley Stand Down Association. Read the full article here.

We’re proud to have the Shasta District Fair as a member of CFSA!

The Solano County Fairgrounds is in the News!

Friday, October 20, 2017

The Solano County Fairgrounds is in the news again – this time on page one of The Sacramento Bee newspaper. And although no fair staff members were mentioned by name, we all know they are working hard behind the scenes to accommodate their four- and two-footed guests threatened or displaced by wildfires. CFSA is proud to have the Solano County Fairgrounds as a member – thank you for all your good work!

Here’s The Sacramento Bee article:

When the flames came to California’s wine country, where did all the animals go?

By Cynthia Hubert
chubert@sacbee.com

As smoke and flames threatened her rural property in Suisun City last week, Cristina Santini’s thoughts turned to her 38 goats and sheep.

She and her husband Flavio had been told to get out ahead of the Atlas Fire that was raging in Solano County. There seemed to be no time for the couple to chase their livestock down, pack them into trailers and drive them to safety. The county seemed unlikely to help, since it was in the process of evacuating thousands of humans threatened by the flames.

“Maybe I should open the gates and let them run for their lives,” Santini recalled thinking at the time.   Read More  >   

 

 

Here’s a Tip for nQativ Activity Users – When You Forget Your Activity Password: Three Tries and You’re Out… but Not for Long!

 

Locked out of your Activity account? After three failed log in attempts, your next step isn’t to call CFSA. Instead, wait 10 minutes and your account will automatically unlock itself. Initiated several years ago, this 10 minute time out was added to defeat spammers who try to crack passwords through repeated hits.

After the 10 minutes have passed, type in your password and you’re in! If you still can’t remember your password, you will need to call Kevin Wright, (916) 263-6187, at CFSA to reset it for you. Your new password must have eight characters of which there needs to be at least ONE CAPITAL LETTER and at least ONE NUMBER. Note: You cannot use more than two consecutive letters from a previous password.

In addition, remember that your Activity password will automatically expire every 90 days. By creating a new password on a regular basis you are helping to protect your account and CFSA’s servers from being hacked!